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Why does access to the SQL Server make our router go crazy?

I'm running Windows 2000 Advanced Server, IIS 5.0 and Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise.

Our SQL Server machine is plugged into a D-Link router along with three other computers on our network. When someone connects to the SQL Server remotely or by accessing ASP pages that execute commands to the SQL Server, the router goes CRAZY. All of the port lights flash on and off. This kills our entire Internet connection, and the only way I've found to bring back up our Internet is to restart the SQL Server machine or by unplugging the CAT cable from the SQL box out of the router. I have to eventually restart the SQL machine if I want to be able to reconnect the SQL machine to the router.

Any ideas on what could be causing this?

Thank you for any help you may be able to provide!

I'm running Windows 2000 Advanced Server, IIS 5.0 and Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise.

Our SQL Server machine is plugged into a D-Link router along with three other computers on our network. When someone connects to the SQL Server remotely or by accessing ASP pages that execute commands to the SQL Server, the router goes CRAZY. All of the port lights flash on and off. This kills our entire Internet connection, and the only way I've found to bring back up our Internet is to restart the SQL Server machine or by unplugging the CAT cable from the SQL box out of the router. I have to eventually restart the SQL machine if I want to be able to reconnect the SQL machine to the router.

Any ideas on what could be causing this?

Thank you for any help you may be able to provide!

Unfortunately, there is no fast or easy answer to this. You'll have to go through the painstaking process of troubleshooting and diagnosing the problem. For example, your router craziness could be caused by a very poorly coded application where every SELECT statement uses SELECT * FROM foo. Alternately, it could be a flaky network card that is misbehaving. I suggest you start at SQL-Server-Performance.

From the limited information provided in your question, I'd be inclined to update all of your service packs (first) and then make sure that the router is good. But that's just a hunch. You'll have to do considerable investigation using Windows Performance Monitor or a third-party tool such as Quest's Spotlight or Idera's Diagnostic Manager. Also, check the SQL Server error logs and Windows Event logs to see what sort of messages may be appearing that are related to your troublesome behavior. Once you've looked for detailed information, it's time to start searching on Google or Microsoft's support site for ways to solve your problem.

This was last published in August 2005

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