Step 2: Perform an active scan

Learn how to probe your network looking for SQL Servers instances in this SQL Server patch management guide.

Armed with a list of IP addresses and ranges to scan, you need to probe the network looking for SQL Servers. Most

scanning tools will work off of some combination of TCP port 1433 scanning, using UDP port 1434 packets to query the SQL Resolution Service, or query the remote registry and file system. There are quite a few tools available to help you in those tasks. Among them are:

It should be noted that many of these scans will not return results in the case of personal firewalls, disabled netlibs, or a lack of appropriate rights on the machines being scanned.


HOW TO PATCH SQL SERVER, PART 1

 Home: Introduction
 Step 1: Map your network
 Step 2: Perform an active scan
 Step 3: Check for SQL registrations
 Step 4: Probe remote services
 Step 5: Probe for SSNetlib.dll versions
 Step 6: Directly request version information
 Go to: How to patch SQL Servers, part 2

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Chip Andrews is the director of research and development for Special Ops Security Inc. and the founder of the SQLSecurity.com Web site, which focuses on Microsoft SQL Server security topics and issues. He is also the author of SQL Server Security.

Dig deeper on SQL Server Database Modeling and Design

Pro+

Features

Enjoy the benefits of Pro+ membership, learn more and join.

0 comments

Oldest 

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

SearchBusinessAnalytics

SearchDataCenter

SearchDataManagement

SearchAWS

SearchOracle

SearchContentManagement

SearchWindowsServer

Close