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  • Developments in SQL Server BI point to focus on self-service, users

    Today, business analytics is largely focused on self-service software and pushing business intelligence capabilities down to the end user. In this three-part handbook, we drill down on the trends and technologies serving to further the scope of SQL Server BI capabilities today.

    Readers will learn more about those capabilities, starting with the five developments technology expert Bob Sheldon says fit most strongly into the BI equation -- and those are just a sample of the myriad developments at play. Readers can also expect an in-depth look at the risks and rewards involved in SQL Server implementation -- especially as full, self-service analytics become the norm. We close with a look at Power Map, the three-dimensional mapping tool originally introduced as GeoFlow. The add-on to Microsoft Excel 2013, not yet released to production, can plot more than one million rows of data from an Excel workbook using columns, heat maps and bubble visualizations -- and is quickly gathering steam as a potential answer to more accurate, in-depth data visualization.

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  • Understanding SQL Server virtualization

    These days, virtual servers are often seen as time- and money-saving efforts for businesses. When deciding if going virtual is the right thing to do, it’s important to consider myriad of things, including the age of your physical servers, the amount of data to be migrated to the virtual server, the experience of your IT staff and the I/O benefits.

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      • Understanding Microsoft SQL Server business intelligence options

        Microsoft has made a great effort to turn SQL Server into a viable enterprise database platform, and part of that has been boosting its business intelligence capabilities. In this handbook, read about recent BI updates in SQL Server 2012. See how Microsoft is trying to push business intelligence capabilities down to the business end user, largely through Excel. Finally, check out some BI best practices for SQL Server.

        View E-Handbook
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      Page 1 of 1
    • Page 1 of 1
      • Developments in SQL Server BI point to focus on self-service, users

        Today, business analytics is largely focused on self-service software and pushing business intelligence capabilities down to the end user. In this three-part handbook, we drill down on the trends and technologies serving to further the scope of SQL Server BI capabilities today.

        Readers will learn more about those capabilities, starting with the five developments technology expert Bob Sheldon says fit most strongly into the BI equation -- and those are just a sample of the myriad developments at play. Readers can also expect an in-depth look at the risks and rewards involved in SQL Server implementation -- especially as full, self-service analytics become the norm. We close with a look at Power Map, the three-dimensional mapping tool originally introduced as GeoFlow. The add-on to Microsoft Excel 2013, not yet released to production, can plot more than one million rows of data from an Excel workbook using columns, heat maps and bubble visualizations -- and is quickly gathering steam as a potential answer to more accurate, in-depth data visualization.

        View E-Handbook
      • Understanding Microsoft SQL Server business intelligence options

        Microsoft has made a great effort to turn SQL Server into a viable enterprise database platform, and part of that has been boosting its business intelligence capabilities. In this handbook, read about recent BI updates in SQL Server 2012. See how Microsoft is trying to push business intelligence capabilities down to the business end user, largely through Excel. Finally, check out some BI best practices for SQL Server.

        View E-Handbook
      Page 1 of 1
    • Page 1 of 1
      • Understanding SQL Server virtualization

        These days, virtual servers are often seen as time- and money-saving efforts for businesses. When deciding if going virtual is the right thing to do, it’s important to consider myriad of things, including the age of your physical servers, the amount of data to be migrated to the virtual server, the experience of your IT staff and the I/O benefits.

        View E-Handbook
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      Page 1 of 1